Tuesday, December 12, 2017

The Cemetery BoysThe Cemetery Boys by Heather Brewer
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Stephen's mother is in a mental institution and he and his dad have to move back to his dad's old town. They move in with a grandmother, who is rude, uncaring and unforgiving. Seventeen year old Stephen meets the mysterious twins, Devon and Cara on his first night in town. He becomes in enthralled with Cara's beauty and the fact that she likes him back only adds to his "love at first sight". Devon is just as enthralling to Stephen at first. He has that mysterious cool, and he invites Stephen to become a part of his mysterious group of friends. They hang out at the cemetery which they call "The Playground".
There is an old urban legend in Spencer, that a human scarifice to some nightmarish creatures will change the bad luck that has afflicted the town.

This book reminded me a little of The Lost Boys with Devon and his mysterious friends. The story was very quick to read and flowed. It was also a little scary and creepy! (which I love!) I would have like a little more detail on the supernatural side. If you are looking for a quick read that will keep you awake at night, I recommend this book for you.


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All the Bright PlacesAll the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

I feel a little guilty giving this book only 2 stars. I think if I had read it BEFORE I read Holding Up the Universe, I would have rated it higher.

Theodore Finch is obsessed with death, although he has never officially tried to kill himself. Violet has recently lost her sister in an accident from which Violet survived. They meet up in the bell tower at school. Everyone knows that Finch has always been a little different, so even though Finch talks Violet off the ledge, everyone assumes she was the one that talked Finch off the ledge. So begins a friendship. Violet and Theodore work together on a project where they have to explore and get to know Indiana. During their excursions, they get to know each other and grow close.

I felt like the characters were too perfect visions of their mental issues. I'm not sure if that makes sense, but it almost seems like they are both textbook cases of what there issues are. While the story does deal with mental issues, I don't think the characters are believable. The dscriptions of the activites they do were great, but I don't feel like the story flowed.

If you want to read a 5 star Jennifer Niven book, read Holding Up the Universe.


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Monday, December 11, 2017

Long Way DownLong Way Down by Jason Reynolds
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Will's brother Shawn was shot and killed yesterday. Today Shawn needs to follow "the rules" and do not cry, don't snitch, and do get revenge. He finds Shawn's gun in his drawer and sets out to do what is expected. But what if he's wrong? During the elevator ride, Will encounters some things that make him question the rules. What if the rules are wrong?
This heartfelt book is beautifully written in verse. The story flows and pulls you in until the very end. The characters are well developed. Not only will fans of Jason Reynolds enjoy this book, but any Young adult book fan will thoroughly enjoy this heartbreaking yet engaging story.


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Tuesday, December 5, 2017

A Thousand Pieces of You (Firebird, #1)A Thousand Pieces of You by Claudia Gray
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

First off, I want to say that I love this cover!
Marguerite's father has recently been killed by someone she used to trust. Her parents have invented a device called Firebird, that is used for interdimensional travel. Marguerite and her parent's trusted assistant, Theo, use the Firebird to try and hunt down the person they think killed her father. The Firebird allows them to inhabit the body of themselves in that dimension. They interact with many different versions of people around them. The story is full of twists, turns, suspense, and surprise.


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Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Locked in TimeLocked in Time by Lois Duncan
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Nore is visiting her father and and his new wife and family in Louisina for the first time since her mother has died. Her father had suddenly remarried. When Nore gets to the plantation home, there is no phone and very limited electricity. Her new step siblings treat her nice, if not a little strange. Nore starts to realize that all may not be what it seems with her new family and sets out to prove as much to her dad.

I was a huge Lois Duncan fan way back when I was in high school. I think this a good addition to any YA collection. It is like Tuck Everlasting, but a little scarier. I really like how Lois duncan is a pretty timeless writer.


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Naomi and Ely's No Kiss ListNaomi and Ely's No Kiss List by Rachel Cohn
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Naomi thinks she is in love with her best friend Ely even though she knows Ely is gay. She is dating Bruce #2 (after using Bruce #1 and leaving him longing for her). Ely kisses Bruce #2 knowing that he is dating Naomi. Bruce #2 realizes he would rather be with Ely than Naomi. Naomi is seemingly ok with Ely kissing Bruce #2, but then gets very upset when she finds out he was hiding in Ely's closet and Ely didn't tell her. Naomi sulks for a really long time and tires dating Bruce #1 again and then starts liking Gabe (#2 on the No Kiss List). In the end, Ely and Naomi realize they can't give up on their best friendship.
I normally like David Levithan books. This book is written from multiple perspectives. That is a tricky thing to do, and this book does it okay. It was not too difficult to figure out whose perspective the chapter was about. That being said, this book was not that great. I think the two main characters were very annoying, belittling and obnoxious. They were very self centered.


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Monday, November 27, 2017

All Rights Reserved (Word$, #1)All Rights Reserved by Gregory Scott Katsoulis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Imagine living in a world where you are charged for every word and gesture because they are copyrighted. In this dystopian novel, once someone turns $15, they have to pay for spoken word, every nod, every scream and every gesture. Speth Jime has always known that the moment she turned 15, she would have to give her Last Day speech and celebrate her transition into adulthood by choosing brands to align with and support. If not, she risks going into debt for every word she speaks.

Right before she is about to give her Last Day speech, her friend commits suicide rather than having to live under a life of family debt. This makes Speth question the world in which she lives. She chooses not to say anything at all, or make any costly gestures or nods. She still wants to make sure her family is taken care of, and doesn't realize the rebellion that her defiant behavior will cause.

After a terrible attack, she meets Henri and his group. She needs to find out if this is where she belongs, and who she can trust.

This is such an interesting concept. The story is well-written, and the characters are pretty well developed.


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